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VIDEO: Emma Lundberg on Mapping the Spatiotemporal Proteome Architecture of Human Cells

Author
Michael Fenn

Director External Innovation, Dewpoint Therapeutics

Type Kitchen Table Talk
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Emma Lundberg, the Director of the Cell Atlas, and founding member of the Human Protein Atlas program joined Dewpoint and Condensates.com on June 1st for a lively discussion about her lab’s work as part of the Kitchen Table Talk series. Emma is an Associate Professor of Bioengineering and Pathology at Stanford, recently having moved from KTH Institute of Technology in Sweden.

Her research focuses on bioimaging and spatial proteomics, and her efforts have led to systematically assessing cell biology at a single cell level using an antibody-based approach. This work has resulted in an image-based map of subcellular distribution of the human proteome, which really highlights the complexity of subcellular organization, and has implications for characterizing and cataloging the components of biomolecular condensates. You’re going to see some of this work in the video below. Emma was also kind enough to provide written answers for a couple questions she didn’t have time to answer during the live show–you can find those further below. Enjoy!

Emma Lundberg on Mapping the Spatiotemporal Proteome Architecture of Human Cells


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TRANSCRIPT

Michael Fenn (00:00:00):
Thanks for joining us, Emma. Really appreciate it today and we’re really excited to have you. Just a real quick intro, then I’m going to turn it over to Emma and let her go. Emma is associate professor of bioengineering and pathology at Stanford, recently having moved from KTH Institute of Technology in Sweden. Emma is also director of the Cell Atlas, and founding member of the Human Protein Atlas program, which I think many of you are probably aware of. Her research focuses on spatial proteomics and cell biology. She works really at the interface of bioimaging and proteomics, where her efforts have led to systematically assessing cell biology at a single cell level, using an antibody-based approach. You’re going to see some of this work today, and this work has resulted in an image-based map of the subcellular distribution of the human proteome, which really highlights the complexity of subcellular organization.

Michael Fenn (00:00:56):
So today we’re going to hear a bit about Emma’s work in regards to the subcellular spatiotemporal variability, as well as temporal changes of cellular compartments and composition, which I think we all have a pretty good idea of the many implications this has in the context of characterizing and cataloging biomolecular condensates. And she’ll also talk a bit about the computational techniques that she uses in processing this vast amount of data these techniques create. So with that, I’m going to go ahead and turn it over to Emma. And again, thanks so much for joining us today.

Emma Lundberg (00:01:27):
Thank you so much for inviting me and thanks for that introduction, and to all of you watching, thanks for joining and I look forward to hearing your questions. Let’s get started. I’m going to talk, as you heard, about our work to map the spatiotemporal architecture of human cells, the proteome architecture. And this work is, as you also heard, to great extent, based on the use of antibodies. But the reason that my lab is interested in the subcellular organization of proteins is, as I’m sure you are a crowd that is very aware of that, is of course that cellular processes are partitioned in time and space, and knowing where a protein is located gives us good clues about its function. It’s also known that relocalization of proteins is an important form of functional regulation and mislocalization may be a cause of disease…

EXTENDED Q&A

Question from Shruti Jha: Is Enolase1 gfp tagged or IFed?
Emma’s Response: Enolase1 was visualized with an antibody in the image that I showed…

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